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Frequently Asked Questions

We are often asked questions on social media about what we do - here are real questions posed to us, and our answers.

How do you choose what clothes to stock?

Our three main criteria are that the clothes must be:
  1. Ethically produced. This means that all employees are, at a minimum, adults who receive fair wages, are working under healthy conditions and are free from exploitation or discrimination. Many of our suppliers go beyond this and also have organic certification. 
  2. Gender Neutral. Colours are for everyone! Every style for every kid! All the clothes we stock can be worn by all genders - and as you will see in our photos, they are!
  3. Comfortable. A child's most important job is to play - this is how they learn and develop. Therefore none of our clothing will restrict a child in any way - physically or mentally.
    We are very excited to have already partnered with a number of fabulous clothing labels. We are continuing to contact companies and people that align with our philosophies to stock their products. If you know anyone we need to connect to, do let us know!

    I don't understand! What a weird concept - girls and boys are different and difference is beauty! 

    It is a weird concept for some because big corporations' marketing departments over the past 30 years have done an incredible job of convincing us that clothes and colours have genders.  At Freedom Kids, we believe in letting kids decide what colours/styles they prefer to wear - not imposing rigid societal norms. I promise you there are still a zillion places you can go to to buy your pink-princess-tutu-for-girls-only, and blue-truck-tshirt-for-boys-only - we are just not one of those places.


    Do you have your own 'Freedom Kids' range of clothing?

    Not yet! ...But we are working on this. We want to ensure that at every stage of the process ethical practices are adhered to. This makes the process more complex (as opposed to finding the cheapest possible cotton from exploited farmers, and a sweat-shop to sew the clothes).

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